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Author Topic: Bengali Proverbs  (Read 38164 times) Average Rating: 0
 
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doKhin Haowa
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« on: June 07, 2008, 02:07:29 PM »

  • অগভীর জলে সফরী ফরফরায়তে
  • Translation: A small fry bustles in shallow water.
  • English equivalent: An empty vessel sounds much.

  • অতি দর্পে হতা লঙ্কা।
  • Translation: [King Ravana's] excessive vanity was Lanka's fall.
  • Meaning: Pride will have a fall.

  • অতিবাড় বেড়ো নাকো ঝড়ে পড়ে যাবে।
  • Translation: Don't grow too high lest a storm makes you tumble down.
  • Meaning: Pride will have a fall.

  • অর্ধ সত্য মিথ্যা অপেক্ষা ভয়ঙ্কর।
  • Translation: Half truth is more frightening than falsehood.

  • আঁস্তাকুড়ের পাত কখনও স্বর্গে যায় না।
  • Translation: The dustbin's dropping never goes to heaven.
  • Meaning: An ignoble person can never continue in a noble company.

  • আপনার পায়ে কুড়ল মারা।
  • Translation:
  • English equivalent: To dig one's own grave.

  • উঠন্ত মুলো পত্তনে চেনা যায়।
  • Translation:
  • English equivalent: Morning shows the day.

  • উলুবনে মুক্তো ছড়ানো।
  • Translation: Scattering pearls in a forest of reeds.
  • English equivalent: Pearls before swine.

  • কণ্টকে কণ্টকোদ্ধার করা। / কাঁটা দিয়ে কাঁটা তোলা।
  • Translation: Using a thorn to remove a thorn.

  • যেমন কর্ম তেমন ফল।
  • Translation: As the act so the result.
  • Meaning: As you sow so you reap.

  • রাজায় রাজায় যুদ্ধ হয়, উলুখাগড়ার প্রাণ যায়।
  • Translation: Kings war with one another; the ulu reed loses its life.
  • Meaning: While the kings make war, the civilians die.

  • ধান ভানতে শিবের গীত।
  • Translation: Songs of Shiva while husking rice.
  • Meaning: Saying something totally irrelevant to the present occasion.

  • কানা গরুর ভিন্ন পথ।
  • Translation: The different path of the one-eyed cow.
  • Meaning: The fool strays from the safe path.

  • কারও পৌষ মাস, কারও সর্বনাশ।
  • Translation: One's harvest month, is another's complete devastation.

  • বারো মাসে তেরো পার্বণ।
  • Translation: In twelve months, thirteen festivals.
  • Meaning:A superabundance of occasions for celebrations.

  • বামুন গেল ঘর তো লাঙল তুলে ধর।
  • Translation: The Brahmin left the house so put away the plough
  • English Equivalent: The cat's away, the mice will play.

  • মানুষ মানুষের কাছে অচেনা ভাবে আসে, চরিত্রের গুণে মানুষ সবার চোখে বাসে।
  • Translation: People approach people without prior knowledge; it is in the quality of one's character that a person remains in everyone's eyes.

  • সময় বহিয়া যায় নদির স্রোতের প্রায়।
  • Translation: Time flows along like the river's current.
  • English Equivalent: Time is money.

  • ভাবিয়া করিও কাজ, করিয়া ভাবিও না।
  • Translation: Act after thinking, don't think after acting.
  • English Equivalent: Look before you leap.

  • ভালবাসার নৌকা পাহাড় বইয়ে যায়।
  • Translation: The boat of affection ascends mountains.

  • চোখ মনের আয়না।
  • Translation: Eyes are the mirror of mind.

  • ডাঙায় বাঘ জলে কুমির।
  • Translation: (There's) a tiger on the land, (and) a crocodile in the water.
  • English equivalent: Between a rock and a hard place.

  • না মামা থেকে কানা মামা ভাল।
  • Translation: A one-eyed uncle is better than no uncle.
  • English Equivalent: Something is better than nothing.

  • অধিক সন্যাসিতে গাজন নষ্ট।
  • Translation: With too many ascetics, the gajon festival is ruined.
  • English Equivalent: Too many cooks spoil the broth.

  • কম পানির মাছ বেশ পানিতে উঠলে ও মাছে বেশ লাফালাফি করে।
  • Translation: If a fish of little water moves to a lot of water, that fish will jump around a lot.
  • Meaning: One will always stand out if they move to a place to which they don't belong.

  • Hagor Loge Hag Nai Rounor Biromana (Sylheti Dialect)
  • Meaning: Being unnecessarily flashy is pointless

  • Shikar Shomoi Kutti Agayo Na (Sylheti Dialect)
  • Meaning: Don't call me for no reason

  • শাক দিয়ে মাছ ঢাকা
  • Translation: Covering fish with greens.
  • English Equivalent: To try to hush something up, when it already known to many.

  • লোভে পাপ, পাপে মৃত্যু
  • Translation: In greed is sin, in sin is death.
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« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2008, 12:35:17 PM »

bagla proverb er engreji porte kemon jeno khet khet lagche...ekdom bhalo na...aha koto modhur lage nijer bhashai shunte...
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« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2008, 04:14:32 PM »

bangla vashar modhurotar kotha tullei jokhon, tokhon Md. Zafar Iqbal sir er ei lekhata pore dekho

http://www.fhiredekha.com/forum/index.php?topic=89.msg372#msg372
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« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2008, 06:27:09 PM »

Proverbs of Bangladesh

Proverbs are brief sayings that reveal a common truth and express the perceptions of a community based on experiences in life, society and the world. The Bangla word that is used is 'probad', which translates to 'statement' or 'saying'. These sayings are then passed along orally through the generations, eventually becoming well-known Bengali proverbs.

Bangladesh's proverbs provide insight into the traditions, wisdom, spirit, folk belief, education and talents of the nation. Although transmitted over many generations, Bangla proverbs are just as pertinent today.

Below are examples of proverbs from Bangladesh. See what truths and perceptions you can learn about in these short but powerful expressions.

“Half-truth is more dangerous than falsehood” (Ardha-Satya Mithya Apeksa Bhayankara)
“Thirteen festivals in twelve months” (Baro Mashe Tero Parbon) – many occasions for celebrating.
“Time flows like the flow of water in a river” (Shomoy Bohia Jaey Nodir Sroter Praye)
“This is a happy time of the Harvest for one, it is complete devastation for someone else” (Karo Poush Maash, Karo Shorbonash)
“Hide the fish with greens” (shak die machh dhaka)
“Saying something irrelevant to the present occasion” (Dhan Bhante Shiber Geet)
“You cannot eat a fried fish by flipping it” (bhaja machh ultie khete pare na” - an inept person
“Since the Brahmin who owns the land is away, the hired ploughmen stop working” (Bamun Gelo Ghar To Langal Tule Dhar)
“Think before you do, not after you're done” (Bhabia Korio Kaj, Koria Bhabio Na)
“A one-eyed uncle is better than no uncle at all” (Na mama theke kana mama bhalo)
“Being unnecessarily flashy is pointless” (Hagor Loge Hag Nai Rounor Biromana)
“The eyes are the mirror of the mind” (Chokh Moner Ayna)
“People meet each other without prior knowledge. It is a person's character which displays their true attributes to the eyes.” (Manush Manusher Kache Ochena Bhabe Ashe, Choritrer Gune Manush Shobar Choke Bashe)
“The deer has enemies because of its flesh”
“Unless a man is simple, he cannot recognize God, the Simple One.”
“There is not a single village without a river or a rivulet and a folk poet or a minstrel”

Source: http://www.bangladesh.com/proverbs/
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« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2008, 06:28:20 PM »

Proverbs (probad) short intelligent sayings that convey the essence of human experience about life, society and the world. Etymologically, the Bangla word 'probad' means a particular 'saying' or 'statement'. Such expressions orally handed down from one generation to another are proverbs. In addition to the long experience of human beings, proverbs also hold the essence of everyday wisdom, talent, spirit, tradition, education and folk beliefs of a society or a nation They are an important segment of folk literature. Although they grow out of things of the past, proverbs concern contemporary life as well.
 
Proverbs are epigrammatic: they may extend from a tiny sentence to a rhyming couplet, but convey a meaningful idea. These short statements are generally accepted observations of life based on experience. Some oft-quoted proverbs are: অনেক সন্যাসিতে গাজন নষ্ট/ anek sannyasite gajan nasta (too many cooks spoil the broth), চোর পালালে বুদ্ধি বাড়ে/ chor palale buddhi bare (getting wise after the event), জোর যার মুলুক তার/ jor jar muluk tar (might is right), লাগে টাকা দেবে গৌরী সেন/ lage taka debe gaurisen (don't worry, someone is there to pay). Proverbs are withy. No other form of folk literature can express so much in such few words.

Proverbs change over time before taking a final shape. Sometimes a proverb may have regional variations. Both the proverbs ধান ভানেত শিবের গীত/ dhan bhante shiver git and ধান ভানেত মহীপালের গীত/ dhan bhante mahipaler git mean the same thing - 'sounding high in mundane affairs'. The god of agriculture Shiva precedes Mahipala, so it is assumed that the former is the original proverb. Substituting Shiva with Mahipala is a later variation.

Proverbs change their meaning, from a literal meaning become figurative. The proverb অতি ভক্তি চোরের লক্ষণ ati bhakti chorer laksan (too much reverence is the mark of a cheat) might be a specific experience of an individual, but it has widened its meaning and use. It now applies to anyone who shows good intentions but harbours a bad one. The proverbs চোরের মার বড় গলা/ chorer mar bada gala (the mother of a thief is the loudest in denunciation), চোর না শোনে ধর্মের কাহিনী/ chor na shone dharmer kahini (a rogue does not listen to a discourse on honesty), চোর পালালে বুদ্ধি বাড়ে chor palale buddhi bade (getting wise after the event) etc are not necessarily related to thieves or theft, rather mean that sermons are futile after harm has been done. The proverb ঘোলা পানিতে মাছ শিকার/ ghola panite machh shikar (to fish in troubled water) might be a fact but it means exploiting a situation for social or political gain. The proverb নাচতে না জানলে উঠান বাঁকা/ nachte na janle uthan banka (a bad workman quarrels with his tools) might point to a dancer who once found fault with the place she was dancing on, but it now means finding an excuse for failure.

The Germans have a proverb about proverbs: As the country, so the proverb. In Scotland, people say, As the people, so the proverb. So, the nature of proverbs depends on the nature of the people of a country. This means that proverbs are based on the nature, environment, surroundings, trends in the national life, history, culture, religion, society and family of a country. Proverbs are the mirror of lifestyle of a people, and, although fragmentary, depict the real picture of a society.

Since the proverbs are the essence of the wisdom of human beings, it is assumed the people acquired the knowledge of proverbs after other branches of folk literature flourished. The use of proverbs can be traced back to a story written on papyrus in Egypt around the 5th century BC. Proverbs are also found in the vedas and the upanisads. The oldest specimen of bangla literature, the charyapada, also has a few proverbs, including the proverb অাপনা মােস হিরণা ৌবির/ apna mase harina bairi (the deer has enemies because of its flesh) used by Bhusuku. baru chandidas in his srikrishnakirtan used the same proverb in the 14th century while mukundaram chakravarti used it in Chandimangal in the 16th century.

The classification of proverbs is a complex task. Most compilations of proverbs list them in an alphabetical order. Archer Taylor and B J Whiting classify them on the basis of nouns, adjectives or some main words. According to their system, the proverbs অল্প শোকে কাতর৴ অধিক শোকে পাথর/ alpa shoke katar, adhik shoke pathar (small misfortunes are distressing, huge ones are petrifying) and দুই সিতেনর ঘর৴ খোদায় রক্ষা কর/ dui satiner ghar, khoday raksa kar (Only God can save the family of a man with co-wives) are classified under the headwords শোক/ shok (misfortune) and সতীন satin (co-wife). This system of classification is convenient for compilation but not for judging the merit of the proverbs.

Like other branches of folk literature, proverbs also speak of human beings and their social and natural environment. The proverbs জলে কূমির ডাঙায় বাঘ/ jale kumir dangay bagh (crocodile in the water and tiger on the land or between the devil and the deep sea), [FONT=Bangsee Alpoযেখানে বাঘের ভয় সেখানে সন্ধ্যা হয়/[/FONT] yekhane bagher bhay, sekhane sandhya hay (danger comes where danger is feared), মরা হাতির দাম লাখ টাকা/ mara hatir dam lakh taka (a dead elephant can still yield a hundred thousand coins in value, meaning the ruins of the great are still great), হাতি খাদে পরলে ব্যাঙও লাথি মারে/ hati khade padle byangeo lathi mare (even frogs may kick an elephant fallen in a ditch, oreven little birds may peck at a dead lion), হাতি ঘোড়া গেল তল৴ মশা বেল কত জল/ hati-ghoda gelo tal, masha bale kata jal (fools rush in where angels fear to tread), ঘুঘু দেখেছ৴ ফাঁদ দেখনি/ ghughu dekhechha, phand dekhani (you have seen the dove and not its trap) all relate to man's nature, characteristics and situation.

The proverbs খাওন োদওয়ার মুেরাদ োনই৴ িকল মারার োগঁাসাই/ khaon deoyar murod nei, kil marar gonsai (a husband incapable of feeding the wife beats her like an expert), টাকা থাকেল বােঘর দুধ পাওয়া যায়/ taka thakle bagher dudh paoya yay (money can buy even a tiger's milk, meaning money makes everything), খাজনার োচেয় বাজনা োবিশ/ khajnar cheye bajna beshi (the music is louder than the substance) etc are based on wealth. These proverbs speak of the uneven distribution of wealth and exploitation, along with prodigality.

The proverbs চাচা অাপন পઝাণ বঁাচা/ chacha apan pran bancha (o uncle! save yourself first, meaning self-preservation is the first law of nature), অাপ ভাল োতা জগত ভাল/ ap bhalo to jagat bhalo (if you are good, everything will appear good to you), অাপিন বঁাচেল বােপর নাম apni banchle baper nam (father's name will come if I survive, meaning self-preservation is the foremost task), etc express self-consciousness. Once again, proverbs like দেশর লািঠ এেকর োবাঝা/ dasher lathi eker bojha (ten men's sticks are one man's load, meaning sharing makes the task simpler), দশচেਠઙ ভগবান ভুত/ dashchakre bhagaban bhut (when ten people say so, God turns out to be a ghost, meaning the majority rules the world) and োযিদেক দশ োসিদেকই োখাদা/ yedike dash sedikei khoda (the voice of the people is the voice of God) speak of unity and solidarity. Many proverbs are fatalistic in nature, for example, রােখ অালઇা মাের োক rakhe allah mare ke (If God protects, none can destroy), কপােলর িলখন না যায় খਟন/ kapaler likhan na yay khandan (you cannot erase fate, meaning destiny is inevitable), অভাগা োযিদেক চায় সাগর ੂকােয় যায়/ abhaga yedike chay, sagar shukaye yay (whichever way the unlucky looks, the sea dries up, meaning once unlucky, always unlucky) etc.

Other proverbs relate to the ways of winning or losing wealth, for example, খােট খাটায় িਦਊণ পায়৴ বেস খাটায় অেধગক পায়/ khate khatay dvigun pay, base khatay ardhek pay (he who works himself with the labours earns double, he who makes others work for him earns half), বেস োখেল রাজার ভাਟার ফূরায়/ base khele rajar bhandar phuray (idle consumption empties even a king's treasure) etc all relate. Materialism and pessimism are evident in proverbs such as the following: োয গরઔ দুধ োদয়৴ তার লািথও ভাল/ ye garu dudh dey, tar lathio bhalo (it is better if the kick comes from a milch cow, meaning give me the roast meat and beat me with the spit), দুੈ গরઔর োচেয় শূনઘ োগায়াল ভাল/ dusta garur cheye shunya goyal bhala (better an empty shed than a wicket cow), etc.

Thereare countless proverbs in Bangla relating to the ways of men and women and the peculiarities of their positions in family and society. But proverbs in this category are generally satirical and highlight only their faults. Parents, uncles and aunts, in-laws, grandchildren, co-wives, stepmothers, friends etc are the subjects of such proverbs. Only fathers, mothers and maternal aunts have been spared.

Women are most severely denounced in these proverbs; for instance, িঝ জਲ਼ িশেল৴ বউ জਲ਼ িকেল/ jhi jabda shile, bau jabda kile (teach your maid-servant a lesson by giving her a tough tool to use and teach your daughter-in-law with your fist, meaning maid-servants should be given hard tasks and a daughter-in-law a beating), শাੂিড় মল সকােল৴ োখেয় োদেয় সময় থােক োতা কঁাদব অািম িবকােল/ shashudi mala sakale, kheye deye samay thake to kandba ami bikale (my mother-in-law died in the morning and I'll try to weep over her if I have time at the day's end, meaning indifference on the part of a wife to her mother-in-law), ননিদনী রায়বািঘনী৴ দঁািড়েয় অােছ কাল-সািপনী/ nanadini raybaghini, dandiye achhe kal-sapini (my husband's sister is like a tigress, standing like a venomous snake, referring to the rivalry between the wife and the husband's sister), শੴੂড়বািড় মধুর হািড়৴ িতন িদন পর ঝঁাটার বািড় shvashurbadi madhur hadi, tin din par jhantar badi (a father-in-law's house is most hospitable, but only for three days, meaning fish and visitors smell in three days), দুই সিতেনর ঘর৴ োখাদায় রਉা কর dui satiner ghar, khoday raksa kar (Only God can save the family of a man with co-wives), etc.

There are proverbs related to occupations: অিত োলােভ তঁািত নੈ/ ati lobhe tanti nasta (grasp all, lose all), োমাগল-পাঠান হਣ হল ফারসী পেড় তঁািত/ moghal pathan hadda hala, pharsi pade tanti (when Mughals and Pathans fail, a weaver comes forward to read Persian, meaning fools rush in where angels fear to tread), ঢাল নাই তেলায়ার নাই িনিধরাম সদગার/ dhal nai taloyar nai nidhiram sardar (Nidhiram poses as a captain without shield or sword, meaning a carpet knight), অানািড় ৈবেদઘ কান নੈ৴ কাঠেমালઇায় ঈমান নੈ/ anadi baidya kan nasta, kathmollay iman nasta (a quack is always a bad healer and an ill-educated man is a bad religious leader, meaning a little learning is a dangerous thing), ঘুষ োপেল অামলা তূੈ/ ghus pele amla tusta (bureaucrats are gratified by bribes, meaning every man has his price), কিড় িদেয় িকনব দই৴ গয়লানী োমার িকেসর সই/ kadi diye kinba dai, gaylani mor kiser sai (If I'm to pay for the curd, why on earth is the milkwoman my friend? or there is nothing as free milk), হািকম নেড় োতা ਗ਼কূম নেড় না/ hakim nade to hukum nade na (the judge may change but not his verdict, meaning justice goes its own way), ঝেড় বক মের৴ ফিকেরর োকরামিত বােড়/ jhade bak mare, fakirer keramati bade (the heron is struck down by the storm but the fakir takes the credit, referring to someone who takes credit for something done by someone else), গঁােয় মােন না অাপিন োমাড়ল/ ganye mane na apni modal (a headman without support in his village, meaning a self-styled leader)

Proverbs are the gems of a language. These gems make language crisp and meaningful. In the words of muhammad shahidullah, 'Sundarir alak-tilaker nyay probadbakyaguli bhasay saundarya phutaiya tole' (Just as beauty spots and hair beautify women, proverbs beautify language). [Wakil Ahmed]

Source: http://banglapedia.search.com.bd/HT/P_0297.htm
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« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2008, 06:39:14 PM »

Merits of indigenous knowledge
Hasna J Moudud

Book ReviewAnthology of Bengali Proverbs and Bachans by Muhammad ZamirPublished by Bangla Academy, April, 2003 Cover designed by Rafiqun Nabi
Not often does a highly successful diplomat turn to folk sayings in the oral tradition probably by an uneducated, female named Khana. Both Khana and Dak are attributed to be two women poets of ancient period who lived in eastern part of Bengal, now Bangladesh, composing proverb like Bachans, which survived to this day due to their wisdom and lyrical charm. Muhammad Zamir has recently compiled an anthology of Bengali proverbs and Bachans published by Bangla Academy. It is an attractive book, 228 pages, with contents written in Bengali with English translation and transliteration. Author also provides useful comparison between Bengali and English calendars since the Bachans and Bengali farmers follow Bengali calendar. Also a bibliography has been provided.


It is a unique book as the author himself puts, "The collection of adages are in Bengali, with transliteration in the International Phoneic Script (to facilitate the reading of the proverbs by readers who do not know Bengali), with meaning in Bengali and translation of the common meaning in English." I also congratulate Bangla Academy for introducing fine specimen of Bengali oral tradition for our own people as well as foreign scholars. Often more foreign literary materials are available in Bengali rather than translation and introduction of specimen of our cultural heritage into the outer world.


Muhammad Zamir who was my class friend at Dhaka University in English Department represents a generation of English department graduates who have at a later stage taken to Bengali literature and heritage as a passion and have served mother tongue well with their knowledge and professional expertise in English. I salute them. Zamir has taken up Bachans as subject for his first book and therefore deserves our felicitation rather than criticism. On the other hand if I do not criticise his work I am doomed to be labeled as partial.


The only point I could find is that the historical treatment of Bachans and contemporary literary scene may not be accurate. In the absence of written records or commentaries this is naturally an obstacle. Bengali oral tradition is old and from time to time has gone under the shadow with the introduction of classical Sanskrit language but the important fact is, it has survived. From 10th and 11th centuries onward many compositions were oral but preserved well in the memory by the reciters. From 14th and 15th centuries onwards we have seen more written compositions and records. In the absence of written Bengali most of the compositions were mainly in Sanskrit 'prakrit abhatta' or 'orbachin abhatta' scripts. Local literature and music in Bangladesh was composed in Bengali and practiced in the oral tradition. It was not considered good enough to write it down in Bengali as Pundits point out. Therefore Bachans by Dak and Khana, folk tales, brata katha, although were composed at a very early stage they were carried by oral tradition and therefore have gone through natural linguistic and cultural changes.

These sayings have been preserved from mouth to mouth and are living examples of cultural continuity. Oral tradition which may be a thousand years old is likely to be composed in the existing Buddhist tradition such as the Doha or charyagiti songs composed by the siddahs. Some of the proverbs and Bachans have esoteric quality, some are philosophical and some mundane. In this context Zamir mentions that Sushil Kumar Dey's book on Bangla Probad has identified 10,600 Bengali proverbs.


It would have been very satisfactory if Zamir would have identified his sources for the present collection. We are interested in the proverbs and Bachans, which are representative of and still exist in Bangladesh and whether any district or area is particularly noted for the types of proverbs, which may or may not be composed by Khana or Dak.


It is very interesting to note that sayings of Khana are found in other parts of the region such as Nepal, Assam, Bihar, Orissa and Tripura, which support the idea that the sayings are a part of our common heritage with regional variation. In search of charyagiti I have also traveled to Nepal and Bhutan. There I have come across many charyagiti or new charyagiti composed later than 14th, 15th centuries in Bengali scripts. These collections may throw light on historical and other important literary aspects of a common heritage.


It is generally believed that Khana was born in East Bengal during the period of King Vikramaditya. Khana's Bachan are considered to be pre Vaisnava literature while astrological publications have references to Khana from 14th and 15th century astrological publications. This is no doubt valuable information.


The author has classified into broad categories the present collection of 139 proverbs. 1. Social Adages and Proverbs, 2. General Adages, 3. Khana and Agriculture, 4. Adages on Agriculture. The main features of Khana's Bachans are agricultural wisdom or advice. Khana also included livestock and dairy farming as important tools for agriculture and livelihood. She gives a lot of importance to paddy as the most important crop then and now. She also was an ecologist and encouraged the merits of local fruits rich in food nutrients such as banana. To this day her sayings and advice have not proven wrong inspite of so called agricultural advances made. The present book will throw light on ancient folk literature and merits of indigenous knowledge.


Khana has been known also as an astrologer herself. Khana's husband Mihir was also a well-known astrologer of the time. "Purba asharey dakhina boi, shei batsar bannya hoi," has proven to be right. It is refreshing to note that the recognition and respect paid to Khana and Dak are reflection of talents of women in this region. Rightfully so, the book has been dedicated to Khana the seer and Nasrin, Zamir's very talented wife.

Source: http://www.thedailystar.net/2003/07/29/d30729150290.htm
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« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2008, 06:55:45 PM »

Bengali Folk Rhymes
http://www.folklore.ee/Folklore/vol35/biplab.pdf
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« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2011, 04:46:19 AM »

Bengali proverbs to share:

      Oti dôrpe hôta Lôngka
      Otibaŗ beŗo nako jhôŗe poŗe jabe
      Ôrdho shotto mittha ôpekkha bhôeongkôr
      Ãstakuŗer pat kôkhono shôrge jae na.
      Apnar pa'e kuŗol mara
      Uţhônto mulo pôttone chena jae
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